The Alaska Future Ecology Institute’s mission is to scientifically test and responsibly implement “Arctic rewilding” as a nature based climate solution + biodiversity solution. “Arctic rewilding" the reintroduction of large mammals into northern ecosystems to restore lost ecosystem function, eventually on the scale of millions of bison, horses, elk, musk oxen, etc. The basic hypothesis is that in reintroducing large numbers of large animals to the far north, we can prevent permafrost thaw (a major source of green house gas emissions), pull carbon out of the atmosphere and sequester it in the soil, and increase albedo. The impact of such reintroductions on a large scale could be roughly on the order of taking 1.5 billion cars off the road (all cars on earth). There is growing evidence it could work, including a recent modeling paper in Nature indicating arctic rewinding could prevent up to 80% of permafrost thaw (Permafrost contains 2x more carbon than the earths atmosphere and the thaw has already begun). Further, a team member just published this paper in Science showing that large herbivore reintroduction slows climate caused biodiversity decline at a site in Greenland

Team

Luke Griswold-Tergis

CEO

Kristy Ferraro (Yale University)

Researcher

Dr. Jeff Welker (University of Alaska)

Senior Researcher

Dr Marc Macias-Fauria (Oxford University)

Senior Researcher

Dr Jeppe Aagaard Kristensen (Oxford University)

Researcher

Dr. Eric Post (UC Davis)

Senior Researcher

Nikita Zimov (North East Science Station/ Pleistocene Park)

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Dr. Rhys Lemoine (Aarhus University)

researcher

Phillip Hanke (University of Alaska)

Engineering/construction manager

Dr. Andrew Abraham

Researcher

Olya Irzak (Frost Methane Labs)

Board of Directors

Derek Poinsette (Takshanuk Watershed Council)

Board of directors

Please contact us at:

info@alaskafutureecology.org

(We do actually get and read emails sent to this address.)

Physical location: We are working with the state of Alaska to lease land for the experiment between the towns of Healy and Nenana — just north of Denali National Park.We will share more details as this plan progresses.